Surviving The Wait

There’s lots of waiting involved in the publishing process; from waiting to hear from beta readers, to agents, to editors, to early reviewers until finally your readers.  It would be wise therefore to find ways to cope with the waiting.  I blogged three years ago about waiting and I like to think I’ve improved.  My…

Feeling the fear

‘Nothing will stop you being creative so effectively as the fear of making a mistake.’ This from John Cleese is another quote stuck above my desk, and it’s been there so long it’s starting to look a little faded.  It sums up perfectly something I struggle with occasionally and this week has been one of…

Rekindling the love

When you’re writing to a deadline, either one given or one you’ve set yourself, it can be a tricky balance between getting the words down and enjoying it.  I’m not currently in this rut, but I have definitely been there before.  When the love has gone and all you are left with is a blank…

Hope for the best, prepare for the worst

This is one of the mantras stuck above my desk – it perfectly describes the juxta position you find yourself in when out on submission. So, in practical terms, what does ‘hoping for the best’ look like? It’s recognising the little wins along the way: a beta reader’s critique, an editor’s comments, the very fact…

Taking a break

There’s a lot of advice out there that says if you want to be a writer, you should write every day. Firstly, any advice that uses the word ‘should’ is advice I disregard. Secondly, writing every day does not work for me.  Early on in my writing journey I got trapped into thinking that because…

A read through

If you’ve finished a first draft or completed a round of edits, you’ll be planning a read through – a full read of your manuscript from start to finish.  Often when I am writing I keep the same routine, a series of mental signposts to tell my brain when it is Time to Write.  Some…

Pleased to meet you

If you’ve been writing for a while, you’ll be familiar with getting a manuscript polished and shiny, the plot honed, the arcs soaring, with your characters feeling more familiar than members of your own family.  But here’s the cruel part: you have to move on and write a new story.  You plummet from perfectly crafted…